From large screens to small, the future of broadcast and digital media was in the spotlight at the National Association of Broadcasters’ NAB Show 2013 that took place April 6-11 at the Las Vegas Convention Center.

NAB reported exhibit space grew nearly 10 percent, compared with 2012. The event had 1,600 exhibitors spanning 900,000 net square feet of exhibit space, up from 815,000 net sq. ft. in 2012. Attendance was also up at 92,414, compared with 91,565 last year.

“It’s shaping up to be our best show since the last peak in 2008,” said Chris Brown, NAB executive vice president of conventions and business operations.

From mobile video delivery to web content development and pending broadcast spectrum regulations, there’s plenty happening in the broadcast industry, and the show is quick to respond to the changes with new programming.

“It’s a very disruptive time, but we can bring people together to zero in on where the opportunities are,” Brown said.
At the Disruptive Media Conference, for example, broadcasters could explore developments in online video, mobile and branded entertainment.

The Connected Media World focused was on the changing consumer habits of media consumptions and the technology that’ shaping the experience, such as IPTV and multiscreen projection onto your living room wall. SPROCKIT gave 10 innovative startups a moment to shine among the big guys.

The buzz on the floor was about 4K, also known as Ultra HD, the next generation of high definition that lets you count every eyelash.
Brown said, “Each time a generational shift occurs, there are new opportunities for us. It drives attendance and generates new exhibiting eco systems.”

The new cool thing next year is likely to be 8K, Super Hi-Vision system that was demoed at the show by the Japanese public broadcaster NHK at NAB’s Futures Park.

It’s always a good sign when by the last day exhibitors are about to lose their voice. Lukas Hurwitz, marketing manager for Inovonics, said they had a very busy four days and successfully launched four products.

The company has becoming to NAB for close to 40 years and he added they consider it a must-attend event for the radio industry.
Hurwitz said he was very pleased with the quality of the leads, adding, “It looks like people who’d been waiting for the past few years are finally ready to spend some money.”

First-time attendee Wayne Giesbrecht, media developer for University of Saskatchewan, was focusing on new ideas of tapeless asset management.

An audio engineer by trade, he said he enjoyed learning about new technologies, especially green screens without the actual screen and computerized handheld steadycam.

“Seeing that in person was very cool,” Giesbrecht added.

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